Eye surgery for IDPs Nepal

This story is written by Sandhya Bhandari, Protection and Accountability Officer for Cordaid in Nepal. During her visits to an IDP camp in Rasuwa she met Jayabudi Tamang, who received a special treatment for her eye condition. 

When I visited her after almost a month since her eye operation, Jayabudi Tamang, aged 60, was washing clothes with her granddaughter. Upon seeing me, she gleefully asked: “I can see you very clearly now, aren’t you the lady who came to observe my operation?”.

IDPs NepalJayabudi, is an Internally Displaced Person (IDP) from Mailung village, in the upper belt of Rasuwa. She is currently residing in Camp ‘A’ and she was one of the beneficiaries of a cataract operation supported by Cordaid last April. My visits main purpose was to know about the progress in her eyes. When asked, she replied, “I used to slip a lot while walking, as my vision used to be blurry. But now I can see. It’s like a miracle.”

I first met Jayabudi in the eye clinic for IDPs, in February 2017. After an examination, they found that she needed surgery for a cataract in her left eye. Considering her economic condition, we planned to provide her and six other patients with a free cataract surgery.

As we found out through a survey in the camps, many IDPs had requested an eye clinic. We decided to organize a free eye clinic with the support from the Community Eye Center Rasuwa for 212 patients. The clinic diagnosed 12 cataract patients.

The project supported them with free eye surgeries. When their eye patches finally came off after the surgery, they were happy to be able to see clearly again. The smiles on their faces reflected on how a small contribution had transformed their lives remarkably.

There are other displaced elderly people in camps like Jayabudi who are very grateful to the project. Jayabudi has been living in camp A from April 2015. Jayabudi said that she had never expected to undergo cataract surgery, saying: “I had never thought that I could see clearly again, as we didn’t have money for the surgery. I used to depend on others because I couldn’t see anything clearly. Now, I can do basic household chores by myself again!”, Jayabudi says with a million-dollar smile.

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